Archive for the ‘clinicals’ category

How to Survive Ross University

June 17, 2012

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If there’s one thing to be said about a Ross University education, it’s that it produces a special sort of doctor. People who come to Ross and make it through are not the sort of people who will take the road of least resistance. I once heard it said that people who come through Ross are the ones who will take the stairs rather than waiting for the elevator. We’re go-getters. We’re tenacious. We don’t let obstacles deter us. We scoff at naysayers, wherever they may be. Over 700 people graduated with me and as different as we all are, each of us shared one characteristic: we were all willing to do whatever it took to achieve our goal. If I were fighting an illness, I’d certainly want a doctor like that taking care of me.

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Operative Management – Surgery Core

September 26, 2011

Today is the beginning of my penultimate semester of medical school. It also happens to be the beginning of the second half of my surgery core. Up until this point, I’ve generally found something to enjoy about every rotation in which I’ve had the opportunity to participate. This time, it hasn’t been easy.

Surgery core at Wyckoff is divided into 6 two-week modules: Surgery Clinics, Day Call, Wound Care, OR, Ambulatory Surgery and Night Call. Clinic and Wound Care have been the least intense modules, generally allowing one plenty of time to study/de-stress in the evenings. As I mentioned before, day call is comprised of 14 days straight of twelve hour shifts (usually preceded by a week of clinic with no break in between). Night call is reportedly similar to day call but students are allowed to take one day off per week and are only required to attend morning lecture and grand rounds, not afternoon lectures, so as to rest up for the night shift and not go insane. One may have the opportunity to scrub in on an emergency operation during day call and/or night call but for the most part, the OR action primarily occurs during the OR and Am Surg weeks. Over the course of those four weeks, students are required to scrub in on at least 10 and observe at least 20 surgeries.

Part of the reason it’s been difficult to find things to enjoy over the past 6 weeks probably has to do with the general atmosphere of surgery, which while occasionally congenial (especially among the residents/interns), can be downright hostile. Things tend to be tense when you’re constantly in fear that you’ll be pimped to death or screamed at by an attending.* The expectation seems to be that we must know everything except how to actually perform surgeries. Everything else pertaining to bodies and/or diseases is fair game. Case in point: yesterday, two students in my group were drilled on Fournier gangrene while scrubbed in on a totally unrelated procedure. None of us had ever heard of Fournier gangrene until yesterday. In addition, there doesn’t seem to be a way to gauge one’s performance. We haven’t received feedback or grades on any of the assignments or quizzes we’ve had thus far and I’ve heard that hardly anyone makes it out with an A, which is pretty disheartening.

Nonetheless, there are a few cool things about surgery – I got to assist on a few chest tube insertions and staple the incision from an open appendectomy. Today, I’m going to observe a brain biopsy and scrub in on a BKA. I hope these little things will be able to sustain me for the next 5.5 weeks…

*Witnessing these incidents is also quite traumatic

Things of Epic Importance

July 31, 2011

Never let it be said that I don’t keep my promises. I vowed in January to update once per month (and twice per rotation) and by God, I’ll stick to it! Well, last month’s updates didn’t really touch upon how awesome my MFM elective at Maimonides was (I’ll get to that) and at this point, I’m 2/3rds of the way through my peds core but the awesome stories will have to wait because on August 17th, I will be taking an exam of epic importance – the USMLE Step 2 CK. It’s taken me a while to really get into extreme study mode but as the fateful date approaches, I am getting more nervous diligent and trying to really study until my eyes bleed. The other epic thing on the horizon is the NRMP which goes live on September 1st – I’ve been trying to get my things together on ERAS but I’ve still got a lot of work to do. Hopefully once the CK is done, I’ll be able to take some time and really check in. Until then, please enjoy this fun game and this cautionary tale. And wish me luck – this is serious business from here on in.

Blood on my Scrubs – EM Elective Week 4

June 27, 2011

(note – this post was originally written on June 4th, 2011)
It was only fitting that my last shift in the SJEH Emergency Department was as hectic as any typical Friday 7 – 7. I had two patients literally sobbing with pain and one who was gushing so much blood that it spilled onto my pants. I had to tell one lady that she’d miscarried and examine three little girls who’d been brought by the police because their mother had tried to commit suicide. There were two attendings on call but only one resident who was new* so I didn’t get a chance to take a lunch break. It was all worth it though, when I overheard one of the attendings tell a consultant, “She can do it. She’s not [a] resident but she’s the brightest one here.”

Over the course of the past 4 weeks, I’ve worked harder than I’ve ever had to in medical school. I performed more pelvic exams than I did during my ob/gyn core. Even though I thought I wasn’t going to be able to practice for CS, the ER was actually a great setting for honing the skills I need to showcase on the exam. For some schools, ER is a core rotation and now I can understand why so many deem it to be an essential part of medical training. I’d definitely recommend it, especially at SJEH.

*The resident was actually a PGY-3 who’d previously done a month of ER during his intern year. When I asked if he needed any help, he declined.

The Countdown Begins

June 14, 2011

Note – the date for requesting an ERAS Token from ECFMG has been changed to June 22nd.

Some quick updates – On Monday, I officially became a 4th year Medical Student. Today (June 14th) is the opening of the 2012 Match Season for IMGs – starting today, one can request a Token for ERAS on ECFMG’s Oasis website. Friday, I’ll be in Atlanta for Step 2 CS. I don’t really have to tell you how nervous I am, do I?

Hopefully after the exam, I’ll have a bit of time to post the updates I’ve been too busy to finish. Monday happens to be my birthday. I probably won’t get a chance to celebrate (nothing too exciting about 29 anyway) but all l really want this year is good Step scores and a Peds residency offer. Wish me luck!

Emergency Medicine Elective, Week 1

May 11, 2011

Just thought I’d drop in with a brief update about how I’m going to lose my mind. On Monday I returned to SJEH to begin my four week Emergency Medicine elective, which is, while so far very exciting, possibly the worst rotation I could have chosen. Over the next couple of months I have  to prepare for Step 2 CS (June 17th), Step 2 CK (July 17th for now, may be changed) and get everything ready for ERAS and the NRMP. In addition, by the 20th of this month, I have to submit the materials required for my school to create an MSPE so spectacular that program directors’ eyes will burst from their heads with wonder at what a spectacular candidate I am. This is of course, after they have swooned from the thrill of how awesome my personal statement and letters of recommendation are and how impressive my CK score is. A high pressure elective (with a schedule of call that makes my study schedule nigh impossible to adhere to) in what is gearing up to be a season full of strain? Excellent planning there! (more…)

腎臓内科医の卵?- Nephrology Elective

April 18, 2011

courtesy Wikipedia

Last weekend, I flew in from Florida, enjoyed two nights of sleep in my old bedroom and set off on my first solo long distance drive to Johnson City, NY in order to begin a 4 week Nephrology elective at UHS – Wilson Medical Center. Nephrology is a subspecialty of Internal Medicine so by the end of this elective, I will have satisfied half of my IM elective requirement (the other half will be satisfied next month).  To be honest, I really wanted to get dermatology or allergy/immunology under my belt so as to appear more attractive to peds residency program directors but it turns out that nephrology is a lot more interesting than I thought it would be. (more…)